Celestial Navigation Returns to US Navy

The Maritime Field

Celestial Navigation Returns to USNA

151015-N-XL102-049  ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Oct. 15, 2015) Lt. Daniel Stayton gives classroom instruction on celestial navigation (CELNAV). The Naval Academy reinstated CELNAV classroom instruction during the summer session of 2015. The Class of 2017 will be the first in many years to graduate with a basic knowledge of CELNAV. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyler Caswell/Released) 151015-N-XL102-049
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Oct. 15, 2015) Lt. Daniel Stayton gives classroom instruction on celestial navigation (CELNAV). The Naval Academy reinstated CELNAV classroom instruction during the summer session of 2015. The Class of 2017 will be the first in many years to graduate with a basic knowledge of CELNAV. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyler Caswell/Released)

Picture this: A naval vessel is navigating the high seas thousands of nautical miles from land. Suddenly all navigation systems become inoperable. What happens next? What does this mean?

The Navy looks to its past to chart its future. With today’s technology rapidly advancing, the Navy realized that many basic techniques are still relevant to safe operations at sea.

Celestial Navigation (CELNAV) is one skill that has not been formally taught to Navy officers, depending on one’s commissioning source, for more than 15 years. Officer Candidate…

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Direct Descendant of, Roman General, and Consul of Rome, BRITTIUS, of the Imperial Roman Army.
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